Global satellite operator SES (NYSE Euronext Paris and Luxembourg Stock Exchange: SESG) announced today it is now controlling nearly half of its growing fleet from a new satellite operations center (SOC) at its commercial sales and satellite engineering office in Princeton, New Jersey.

A team of highly-skilled satellite controllers provides 24/7 monitoring and management of 23 SES satellites, as they deliver services ranging from high quality broadcast television channels to high-speed broadband to millions of people on land, in the air, and at sea throughout North America and around the world.

The remainder of the current SES global fleet of more than 50 spacecraft is managed by controllers stationed at SES’s global headquarters in Luxembourg. Both satellite operations centers are fully integrated, enabling each facility and control team to provide real-time services delivery and backup support across the SES fleet.

“With a constant eye on operational excellence, resiliency and customer success and security, SES has positioned its three primary satellite operations centers in widely diverse regions of the world,” noted Martin Halliwell, Chief Technology Officer for SES. “Our new Princeton-based SOC features the latest control technologies and capabilities that will allow SES to meet ever-evolving customer demands and an ever-changing satellite fleet for decades to come,” Halliwell said. “Whether it’s electric propulsion satellites or an expanding fleet of more than 100 satellites, SES has the expertise and the advanced satellite control stations to deliver on the future.”

“Princeton has long been an important hub for SES satellite engineering expertise and our customer account teams. These critical groups can now collaborate more closely with controllers located just down the hall, to further ensure optimal operations and customer success and satisfaction,” said Rick Starkovs, Senior Vice President of Space Systems and Operations for SES. “Customer success and team collaboration were major drivers behind the migration of this mission-critical satellite operations center to Princeton.”