Film Four & Film Four +1 25-05-08.

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Jungle 2 Jungle
(1997) Tim Allen plays Michael Cromwell, a Wall Street flyer divorcing Patricia, who works with indigenous people deep in the jungle.A city slicker is introduced to the son he never knew he had - a 13-year-old who has been raised in the Amazon jungle. Comedy starring Tim Allen and Martin Short
Tim Allen and Martin Short - together at last! Yep, that's the big selling point of Jungle 2 Jungle, the American family comedy that unites the reformed drug dealer, 'Home Improvement' star and voice of Buzz Lightyear with that geeky-looking bloke who was terrible in Father Of The Bride and even worse in Father Of The Bride Part II. If Jungle 2 Jungle sounds about as much fun as spending an evening in a lift with Jade Goody, this isn't quite the movie atrocity it might sound. Okay, so Allen's as annoyingly bullish as always and Short is as subtle as a Tourette's-afflicted Rodney Dangerfield, but there are things to enjoy here, providing you're prepared to take a deep breath and plough through the comedy excrement. Venezuela, for example, looks lovely, as does the ever-radiant Lolita Davidovich. And while Sam Huntington is impossibly bland as Allen's estranged son, any film that features David Ogden Stiers and Leelee Sobieski has at least two things going for it.
Adapted from Un Indien Dans La Ville by Starman writers Bruce A Evans and Raynold Gideon, Jungle 2 Jungle is really no worse than Three Men And A Baby, Cousins, Just Visiting, My Father The Hero and the many other American movies inspired by French screenplays. Now if only it was even slightly better than those examples of Hollywood at its laziest...

Doctor At Large
(1957) Classic British comedy, with Dirk Bogarde as the hapless young doctor trying to find his way in the medical profession.Dirk Bogarde, Donald Sinden and James Robertson Justice star in this 1957 entry in the medical comedy series
Doctor At Large was the third of the 'Doctor' films, the first of which, Doctor In The House, had been a huge hit in 1954. Based on the novels of real-life practitioner Richard Gordon, the series follows the adventures of Dr Simon Sparrow (Bogarde), a dashing doctor who often finds himself entangled in bizarre comical situations. Following on from Doctor At Sea, this episode finds the young Sparrow on an intense job hunt that takes him to various locations across the UK. His first port of call is St Swithin's Hospital, a place where the good doctor hopes to achieve his goal of becoming a practising surgeon. Unfortunately for Sparrow, he raises the ire of the hospital's chief consultant Sir Lancelot Spratt (Robertson Justice), a cantakerous old git who ensures Sparrow doesn't get the position he wants.
To make ends meet Simon decides to hit the road, eventually winding up at a country practice run by a mean doctor (Jefferies) with a beautiful young wife (Laye). The elder physician's questionable methods of payment, along with unwanted romantic attention from his wife, has Sparrow packing up his stethoscope once more and heading off in search of more stable employment.

The Black Tent
(1956) Anthony Steel stars as a British soldier fighting in Libya and falling in love with a Bedouin sheikh's daughter during World War II.A man travels to the North African desert post-WWII in an attempt to track down his missing brother. Romantic drama starring Anthony Steel, Donald Sinden and Anna-Maria Sandri, and directed by Brian Desmond Hurst
The Black Tent It's a sad reflection of the times when a tale as innocent as that of a Westerner being accepted into an Arab tribe and being allowed to marry the sheik's daughter seems like a far-fetched fantasy. Alas, the 1950s were a more innocent time and such romantic notions were allowed to flourish on film without seeming faintly ridiculous. 1956's The Black Tent is essentially a tale of forbidden romance set among the heady backdrop of World War II's North African campaign of the early 1940s. The film stars Anthony Steel as Captain David Holland, a loyal British soldier who finds himself in the thick of intense military action in the desert. Wounded in a brutal tank attack, David escapes with the help of some Bedouin tribesmen.
The injured soldier is nursed back to health and takes up with the nomadic desert dwellers, thanks in no small part to the fact that he has fallen for the sheik's daughter Mabrouka ben Yussef (played by beautiful Italian actress Anna-Maria Sandri). Given the blessing of the sheikh, the pair soon wed and sire a half-British, half-Libyan son.

Around The World In 80 Days
(2004) Frank Coraci's remake of the classic 1956 film, based on Jules Verne's classic novel, stars Steve Coogan as eccentric inventor Phileas Fogg.Jules Verne's classic tale of Victorian adventure is given an oriental spin in this adaptation. Jackie Chan is the runaway thief helping Steve Coogan's Phileas Fogg win a bet by circumnavigating the globe
Around The World In 80 Days Sharing the title, basic plot and very little else with Jules Verne's original novel, this 2004 cinematic take on Around The World In 80 Days is closer (at least in structure) to Michael Anderson's Oscar-winning 1956 film version, with episodic adventures punctuated by a variety of star cameos. Sadly, while Anderson's film featured iconic faces like Buster Keaton and Frank Sinatra, the best examples this tired action-comedy can muster are Owen and Luke Wilson, Richard Branson, and an embarrassing turn from Arnold Schwarzenegger, sporting a shocking wig, as a randy Turkish prince.

Clear And Present Danger
(1994) Harrison Ford returns as CIA agent Jack Ryan in Phillip Noyce's all-action thriller - the third film based on Thomas Clancy's novels.The third Jack Ryan outing sees Harrison Ford's CIA analyst playing politics and battling Columbian drug dealers. Action thriller co-starring Willem Dafoe
Flabby, overblown and pretentious, Jack Ryan's third cinematic outing (but only Ford's second in the role) very nearly killed off the franchise. It took radical surgery - with Ford being dropped in favour of Ben Affleck as a younger, more vigorous version of the CIA analyst in 2002's Sum Of All Fears to save Tom Clancy's hero. So what went wrong here? For a kick-off, Clancy's sprawling plot about high-level politicking and the Central American drug trade moves with the speed and conviction of a drunk at closing time. Ryan - now bumped up the CIA chain of command to Deputy Director level - finds himself being sucked deeper and deeper into a convoluted cover-up following the assassination of a close friend of the President (Moffat). But it's all plot and talky counter-plot with very little character to give it meaning or action to counterbalance the dreariness of it all. When the action does finally come (don't bother waiting for character development though), it's too little and too late for it revitalise a dull flick.

Miller's Crossing
(1990) The Coen brothers present a complex gangster drama set during the Prohibition era in an unnamed American city.
The Coen brothers present a complex gangster drama set during the Prohibition era in an unnamed American city. Albert Finney, Gabriel Byrne and Marcia Gay Harden star
Miller's Crossing "A handsome film about men in hats" was how Joel and Ethan Coen described their third film, this beautifully-crafted 1929-set gangster film that takes great pains to resurrect the genre. Full of double-crosses, dense plotting and razor-sharp dialogue ("Nobody knows anybody. Not that well," we're told), you'll need to have your wits about you for this one, as gang bosses Leo (Finney) and Casper (Polito) go to war. Pulling the strings behind Leo is his right-hand man Tom (Byrne); intervening between both is Verna (Harden), who packs a mean right hook. Loosely inspired by Dashiell Hammett's classic novel 'The Glass Key', Miller's Crossing contains some fabulous set-pieces, notably a surprisingly athletic Leo defending himself against two assailants to the strains of 'Danny Boy'. There is also some terrific acting, namely John Turturro as the whiney Bernie Bernbaum, the bookie who acts as the catalyst for the gang war. His 'Look Into Your Heart' speech, as he begs for his worthless life at the feet of Tom in the eponymous patch of woodlands, still ranks as one of the finest moments in any film by the Coen brothers.
As ever, the minor support roles are just as detailed. Check out Steve Buscemi as the fast-talking rat-fink Mink, for a delivery that would make Quentin Tarantino look like a man with a stutter. With regular Coen composer Carter Burwell offering his best score to date, and the design and photography all unified towards a luscious green/brown colour scheme, this is indeed a handsome movie.

Gregory's Two Girls
(1998) Bill Forsyth's likeable sequel to Gregory's Girl picks up the action 20 years on.Likeable sequel to the classic 1980s romantic comedy, Gregory's Girl
Gregory's Two Girls Twenty years after his teenage crush on a football-mad schoolgirl in the classic romantic comedy, John Gordon Sincalir (Gregory) is back at his old school, teaching English. His real classroom passion however, is politics or rather, political injustice and the abuse of human rights.When two of his pupils uncover evil practices at a local factory, they want their teacher to help them expose the wrong-doer, who happens to be Greg's old schoolfriend. Greg finds himself trapped between his idealism and breaking the law, and sandwiched between his two girls - one, an attractive young schoolgirl and the other a sexy full-blooded woman. It's one hell of a choice.